Monday 1 May 2017

Industry Lunch Session

       

1230-1330
Riverbank Room 5

Session Title: Walking the tightrope to functional recovery: Are we focused on the right symptoms and outcomes?

Session Speaker: Professor Bernhard Baune

Session Synopsis: 

Reducing symptoms in major mental illness is an important clinical treatment goal for both patients and health care professionals. However, more often than not, functional recovery is difficult to achieve despite improvement of symptoms during treatment. Specifically, symptom remission states in depression have been associated with ongoing psychosocial impairment and failure of workplace recovery. Similarly, a reduction of so called “positive” symptoms in schizophrenia often coincides with a lack of improving psychosocial functionality. Since cognitive symptoms appear to be impaired in most severe mental illnesses both in the acute and remission states, they have been thought to influence functional outcomes in depression and schizophrenia. Specifically, cognitive symptoms have been identified as relevant mediators of functional outcomes in that improvement in cognitive functioning is associated with better functional outcomes, and vice versa, cognitive worsening over time relates to a higher likelihood of disability.

While treatment in the acute disease states focuses rightly on symptom reduction, the longer-term treatment goal of functional recovery is not at the core clinical focus when deciding on treatment choices. Moreover, some of the medications can induce adverse events that may cause cognitive dysfunction, and altered “foggy” or “dull” affect. In this sense, choice of medication based on their possible negative side-effect profile on functionally relevant symptoms might be an important clinical consideration for both the patient and the health care professional in a shared decision making process. Whether current treatment options in depression and schizophrenia improve functional outcomes either by improving negative symptoms, improving cognitive function or by exerting less detrimental adverse events as compared to other drugs, remains to be investigated further.

 

Tuesday 2 May 2017

Industry Breakfast Session

0700-0800
Riverbank Room 5

Session Title: Through the PSYCHIATRIC looking glass – what we found there – A humorous and fantastical look at psychiatry.

Session Speaker: Mark Rowe and Gin Malhi

 

Industry Lunch Session

1230-1330 
Riverbank Room 5

Session Title: Paliperidone Palmitate 3-monthly for the management of schizophrenia

Session Speakers: Dr Srihari Gopal and Dr Prachi Brahmbhatt
Speaker Presentation Timings:
1230-1300 Dr Srihari Gopal
1300-1330 Dr Prachi Brahmbhatt

Session Synopsis:
Long-acting therapies (LAT) may provide an effective treatment strategy for patients with early-phase or first-episode schizophrenia, as well as maintain treatment adherence in patients with chronic schizophrenia. Recent guidelines recommend LAT use earlier in the illness as a means to delay functional deterioration. Paliperidone palmitate 3-montly (PP3M) formulation which was recently approved by the TGA offers a new treatment option for the management of schizophrenia. Registration in Australia was based on two key pivotal trials. PP3M, with its 3-monthly dosing interval, presents a unique treatment option to healthcare providers not only for relapse prevention but also in enabling a greater focus of the care and recovery process on functional outcome and, ultimately, quality of life for patients with schizophrenia.

In the first half of this session, an overview of the clinical evidence demonstrating the benefits of LAT PP3M in the management of schizophrenia will be provided. The outcomes of two PP3M pivotal trials and an observational study of PP1M in newly diagnosed schizophrenia patients treated over a 12-month period will be reviewed. In the second half of the session, practical clinical experiences with PP3M in Australia will be described in order to provide a representative overview for the role of PP3M in the management of schizophrenia. Case studies will be used to illustrate the utility for this new treatment option to facilitate patient independence, social and societal connectedness, and opportunity for psychosocial intervention and functional aspects of patient recovery. 

 

Wednesday 3 May 2017

Industry Breakfast Session

0700-0800
Riverbank Room 5

Session Title: “Can we get close to zero excess medical morbidity in modern mental health services?”

Session Speaker: Professor David Castle

Session Synopsis:
Australians with psychotic disorders have high rates of obesity and metabolic syndrome, making it important to routinely assess anyone taking antipsychotic medications for these side effects. The 2016 RANZCP Guidelines have listed recommended monitoring schedules for patients taking antipsychotic medications as well as management strategies for side effects associated with antipsychotic treatment. Antipsychotic medications have differences in the relative frequency of adverse events. It is important to understand these differences and to apply the appropriate treatment strategy. Professor David Castle, will take the audience through the most recent RANZCP guidelines and recommendations for the management of adverse events commonly associated with antipsychotic agents commonly used today.

 

Industry Lunch Session

1230-1330
Riverbank Room 5

Session Title: Rule it out – Could it be binge eating disorder?

Session speakers: Professor Allan Kaplan, Professor Stephen Touyz and Ms Kathleen Chinn 

Session Chair: Professor Richard Newton 

Session Synopsis:
The challenge of identifying the underlying causes and comorbidities of depression and anxiety can be complex. The DSM 5 recognises Binge Eating Disorder (BED) as a stand alone condition and the prevalence of BED in Australia is increasing, particularly in people living with depression and anxiety. Could BED be the cause?

Chaired by Professor Richard Newton, this symposia will outline the diagnosis and management of binge eating disorder and the devastating impact BED has on patients lives.

Global expert Professor Allan Kaplan from Toronto, Canada and leading Australian psychologist Professor Stephen Touyz, along with Ms Kathleen Chin a recovered BED sufferer will share their knowledge and experiences of the disorder and how to recognise the condition in your daily practice.